Basilicata & Molise
Photographs, Museums, Food, Transportation


Basilicata

Molise



Acerenza
Acerenza
If you looked at a map, you might have trouble figuring out why people so often speak of "Basilicata and Molise." Nowhere do the two tiny regions touch each other; at their closest they are separated by a generous stretch of the Campania-Apulia border. Molise sits on the "rear" of the Italian calf muscle, its eastern edge lapped by the Adriatic. Basilica forms a sort of misshapen half moon stretching from the boot's instep to the top of the foot, and its two tiny coastlines face the Ionian and Tyrrhenian Seas. Perhaps what associates these two regions in so many minds is little more than the way they have been overlooked in the illustrious lineup of Italy's regions. Even we at In Italy have neglected them. Last but not least or, as they say in Italy, dolce in fondo (save the sweet for the end of the meal).

Tursi
Tursi
If we had to be very very honest, there is only one reason we could find for telling certain travelers not to bother with these two regions: with a few renowned exceptions such as Matera and Maratea, they are not accustomed to hosting foreigners. You won't find suave and sophisticated polyglot hoteliers and restauranteurs here. The beds may be a bit lumpy. There may be only one place to eat in town and it may have a limited menu featuring dishes you've never heard of. Then there are the usual suspects: no screens on the windows, not enough water pressure, sporadic "inefficiency"....

To sum up, these are regions for true travelers. If you fall into that category, you can be very richly rewarded by allotting several days to Basilicata and Molise. You'll find the archeological digs, medieval towns, Romanesque churches, Renaissance frescoes and gourmet cuisine are as impressive here as anyplace in Italy. You'll also find unparalleled natural wilderness, and a few attractions you can find nowhere else on earth. We'll tell you all about them in this issue.





[Regions of Italy]