The Detroit Institute of Arts
5200 Woodward Avenue
Detroit, Michigan 48202
(313) 833-7900
The Detroit Institute of Arts

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Ranked fifth largest among the nation's fine arts museums, the Detroit Institute of Arts' holdings survey the art of world cultures from ancient to modern times. Among its renowned works are French Impressionist, German Expressionist, American and Flemish paintings, Italian, African, Asian, Native American, Egyptian and 20th-century art, and Diego Rivera's finest fresco, Detroit Industry, in the museum's central courtyard.

The Detroit Institute of Arts also offers a wide variety of programs, plus special exhibitions. A restaurant and gift shop are located in the museum. Meeting rooms and other museum areas, plus catering services, are available for meetings and special events.

Angel Annunciate
T
he Detroit Institute of Arts
has one of the finest Italian collections in the country. Connoisseurs will find much to feast upon, with 13th- to 16th-century masterpieces including Giovanni Del Biondo's "Angel of the Annunciation" (right), Fra Angelico's "Madonna and Child with Angels," Stefano Di Giovanni's "The Agony in the Garden," Luca Della Robbia's "Madonna and Child," Neri Di Bicci's "Tobias and Three Archangels," Sandro Botticelli's "The Resurrected Christ," Giovanni Bellini's "Madonna and Child," Parmigianino's "The Circumcision," Giulio Romano's "An Allegory of Immortality," Titian's "Man Holding a Flute," Paolo Veronese's "The Mystic Marriage of St. Catherine," plus works by Michelangelo, Correggio, Agnolo Bronzino, Jacopo Sansovino, Tintoretto and others.

Judith and Maidservant with the Head of Holofernes

T
o our left we find an extraordinary painting, Judith and Maidservant with the Head of Holofernes, by the female painter Artemisia Gentileschi. Judith and her maidservant were Israelite women who saved the city of Bethulia from siege by the Assyrian army, after Judith had beguiled and intoxicated Holofernes, the Assyrian general. The painting depicts the scene just moments after she has beheaded him in his tent. We see the maidservant stuffing the head of Holofernes into a sack as Judith keeps watch, sword to her side.

One of the rare female painters of her time, Artemisia Gentileschi (1593 - 1652/1653) was born in Rome to Orazio Lomi Gentileschi and Prudentia Montone. Her father trained her and she became, as her subject in Judith and Maidservant with the Head of Holofernes, a heroine for women to emulate. She competed with the best and was recognized amongst her peers. Writing in 1649 of a Deana and Actaeon that she was then preparing, Artemisia Gentileschi asserted: "This will show your lordship what a woman can do."


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